Could serverless computing work in a public volunteer cloud?

Serverless computing

What’s that old schoolyard rhyme? “AWS and Azure, sitting in a tree, I – A -A – S,  P – A -Y – G. First come VMs, then containers, then come stateless microservices running on public cloud infrastructure at fractions of a cent per second.” Or something like that.

Anyway, application deployments are getting lighter, backend microservices are getting smaller, and now many development shops are moving toward “serverless architectures” in which dynamic computational tasks are handled using a few cycles on somebody else’s managed server. As of 2016, the public cloud giants (AWS, Google Cloud and Microsoft Azure) all have their own “serverless services” that allow you to buy processing time for cheap. And I do mean cheap – a million AWS Lambda requests per month, each lasting five seconds, will set you back about $10.62.

Developers gravitate toward this approach because it’s scalable, cost-effective and requires little to no infrastructure maintenance. In AWS, you might deploy an application with data stores in RDS or DynamoDB, static web content hosted in S3, an API Gateway directing traffic and Lambda functions running the business rules – look Mom, no servers!

But wait a minute. Is a pay-as-you-go public cloud really the only place to run serverless compute functions? After all, a handful of computer scientists have been running little pieces of code on distributed computers for years, at a price even Lambda will never beat: free.

Continue reading “Could serverless computing work in a public volunteer cloud?”

Could serverless computing work in a public volunteer cloud?